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How Much Communication Is Enough in Online Courses? Exploring the Relationship between Frequency of Instructor-Initiated Personal Email and Learner's Perceptions of and Participation in Online Learning ARTICLE

International Journal of Instructional Media Volume 29, Number 4, ISSN 0092-1815

Abstract

Describes a study of doctoral program students that investigated whether more frequent instructor-initiated emails would result in more favorable student perceptions of the student-faculty relationship, higher student ratings of perceives sense of online community, higher degree of satisfaction with the learning experience, and higher levels of student participation in required group discussions. (Contains 65 references.) (Author/LRW)

Citation

Woods, R.H. (2002). How Much Communication Is Enough in Online Courses? Exploring the Relationship between Frequency of Instructor-Initiated Personal Email and Learner's Perceptions of and Participation in Online Learning. International Journal of Instructional Media, 29(4), 377. Retrieved August 17, 2018 from .

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