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Contrasts in Student Engagement, Meaning-Making, Dislikes, and Challenges in a Discovery-Based Program of Game Design Learning
ARTICLE

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Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 59, Number 2, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

This implementation study explores middle school, high school and community college student experiences in Globaloria, an educational pilot program of game design offered in schools within the U.S. state of West Virginia, supported by a non-profit organization based in New York City called the World Wide Workshop Foundation. This study reports on student engagement, meaning making and critique of the program, in their own words. The study's data source was a mid-program student feedback survey implemented in Pilot Year 2 (2008/2009) of the 5 year design-based research initiative, in which the researchers posed a set of open-ended questions in an online survey questionnaire answered by 199 students. Responses were analyzed using inductive textual analysis. While the initial purpose for data collection was to elicit actionable program improvements as part of a design-based research process, several themes emergent in the data tie into recent debates in the education literature around discovery-based learning. In this paper, we draw linkages from the categories of findings that emerged in student feedback to this literature, and identify new scholarly research questions that can be addressed in the ongoing pilot, the investigation of which might contribute new empirical insights related to recent critiques of discovery based learning, self-determination theory, and the productive failure phenomenon.

Citation

Reynolds, R. & Caperton, I.H. (2011). Contrasts in Student Engagement, Meaning-Making, Dislikes, and Challenges in a Discovery-Based Program of Game Design Learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 59(2), 267-289. Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. A systematic review of literature on students as educational computer game designers

    Kevser Hava, Bozok University, Turkey; Hasan Cakir, Gazi University, Turkey

    Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Vol. 27, No. 3 (July 2018) pp. 323–341

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