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Attitudes of college students enrolled in 2-year health care programs towards online learning
ARTICLE

Computers & Education Volume 59, Number 4, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Colleges offering 2-year diplomas to high-school graduates were among the forefront leaders in online learning however studies illustrating appropriate course construction for such student populations are scarce. Pharmacy Math (MATH16532) is a core course for students enrolled in the Practical Nursing (PN) and Pharmacy Technician (PT) programs at Sheridan Institute. PT and PN students enrolled in MATH16532 during their first term were surveyed to determine student attitudes and skills gained from participating in an online course. Students were then followed up during their second term studies to determine transferability of skills gained. Initially, students did not exhibit a positive attitude towards the online version of Math16532. Participation in the online version of MATH16532 however allowed students to enhance their written ability and critical appraisal skills, gain time management skills, and become independent learners. PT and PN students preferred an orientation session at the beginning of the course and a well organized, easy-to-navigate course. Even though considered as predominantly digital native students, both student groups remained anxious throughout the course regarding the online delivery and preferred a hybrid mode of delivery. Despite the initial resistance to an online math course, students indicated that they would retake the course again in an online format towards the end of the course and there appeared to be a trend to enrol in another online course. Several recommendations regarding the design and construct of online courses in a 2-year college program are provided to facilitate acceptance of online learning for students enrolled in such programs.

Citation

Abdulla, D. (2012). Attitudes of college students enrolled in 2-year health care programs towards online learning. Computers & Education, 59(4), 1215-1223. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved September 18, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.06.006

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