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Using SMS texting to reduce procrastination in large-enrollment courses: An Exploratory Study
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, , Miami University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-02-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This presentation will report the results of a pilot study on a system design to reduce procrastination in a large-enrollment course using Short Message Service (SMS) technology. The study focused on three students who initially had below-average performance and demonstrated high procrastination levels. The presentation will include visual and statistical analyses of performance and procrastination levels, and also results from the follow-up interviews. Finally, implementation strategies and recommendations, especially those pertaining to the large-enrollment environment, will be presented. Although this study used a custom system, the results will offer insight into the effective use of commercially and freely available texting services. These results will also provide insight into the amount of time in advance of a deadline, and the frequency of text messages that most effectively reduce the likelihood of procrastination.

Citation

Davis, D. & Abbitt, J. (2013). Using SMS texting to reduce procrastination in large-enrollment courses: An Exploratory Study. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2013--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3119-3121). New Orleans, Louisiana, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 17, 2019 from .

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