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How People, Tools and Rules Enhance or Inhibit Technology Use in the K-12 Classroom: A Design-Based Activity Systems Analysis
PROCEEDINGS

, Northern Illinois University, United States ; , Northern Illinos University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-02-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study explored a group of teachers’ viewpoints of factors that support or inhibit the integration of digital media into the lessons of K-12 English language learners. The study was conducted using a design-based approach and data were gathered and analyzed using elements of Engeström’s (1987) activity systems analysis. A review of participants’ reflections on the activity systems elements of rules, tools, people and division of labor yielded two significant findings. First that schools range from low-functioning to high-functioning in regard to their capacity to support technology use by teachers. Secondly, the most significant determinant in the functioning level of technology use at a school is not the school’s location, socio-economics, or ethnic makeup of a school, but rather the administrative rules that govern technology use of a school.

Citation

Cowan, J. & Daniel, M. (2013). How People, Tools and Rules Enhance or Inhibit Technology Use in the K-12 Classroom: A Design-Based Activity Systems Analysis. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2013--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3107-3115). New Orleans, Louisiana, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 17, 2019 from .