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Examining an Interactive Model of Learning For
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, , Northern Arizona University

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-28-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

One of the principal challenges to the universities of the future is the changing nature of the student body. The term ‘lifelong learner’ is now part of the vocabulary of modern day society. It describes the need for people to continue their education and training throughout life. In the modern day society of multiple career changes and extended productive lives, the word ‘learner’ designates a role rather than a individual. The spreading culture of lifelong learning is even producing changes in the attitudes of the young traditional campus student. These students are demanding flexibility and individualization of the degree process to meet the complexity of their lives.

Citation

Tucker, G. & Batchelder, A. (1998). Examining an Interactive Model of Learning For. In S. McNeil, J. Price, S. Boger-Mehall, B. Robin & J. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1998--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 883-886). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

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