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Teaching Teachers to Change: The Place of Change Theory in the Technology Education of Teachers
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Cambridge, UK

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Goals, in the absence of a theory about how to achieve them, are mere wishful thinking. (Wise 1977)

Citation

Robinson, B. (1995). Teaching Teachers to Change: The Place of Change Theory in the Technology Education of Teachers. In J. Willis, B. Robin & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1995--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 40-44). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Infusing Technology Into a Teacher Education Program: Three Different Perspectives

    Thomas Drazdowski, Nicholas Holodick & F. Thomas Scappatical, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 1996 (1996) pp. 523–526

  2. Infusing Technology Into a Teacher Education Program: Three Different Perspectives

    Thomas A. Drazdowski, Nicholas A. Holodick & F. Thomas Scappaticci, King’s College, United States

    Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 6, No. 2 (1998) pp. 141–149

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.