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Dose Internet Access in Classroom Interfere with Learning Performance?
PROCEEDINGS

, Virginia StateUniversity, United States ; , Virginia State University, United States ; , Virginia Commonwealth University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-66-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The promise of digital technologies is greater than ever, but not if teachers aren’t able to use them effectively. Significant challenges have been raised about the use of technology. With the easy access to the Internet, it is not unusual for students to surf Internet, chat online, and check emails and so on while teachers lecture. Does Internet access affect student performance on learning outcomes? If so, do we need to control how students use computers in classroom? If we cannot control students from accessing Internet, then how to maximize the benefits the digital technologies have brought to us and minimize their side effects on the learning environments? This study is to examine how Web browsing influences classroom learning. Experimental design will be deployed to understand how Web browsing profile will intertwine with task relevancy and personal characteristics and jointly influence student class performance.

Citation

Bai, X., Li, H. & Cui, Y. (2008). Dose Internet Access in Classroom Interfere with Learning Performance?. In C. Bonk, M. Lee & T. Reynolds (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2008--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2474-2479). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 21, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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