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Effective Video Clips for Web-based Language Learning
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, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan ; , National Institute of Multimedia Education, Japan ; , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-66-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

In this study, we investigated what learners aware during watching self through video. Learners seem to notice mostly rather their appearance than contents of their speech. We may say that it would be easier to notice some movements than details of speech and the movements might help learner to study English. Studying English pronunciation using video could be the most effective to be learned. Then, we developed website to study English pronunciation. It could be important to show some movements in model’s video specifically so that learners could notice easily what is important to see. It helps them to focus on what is important more in self videos than in self audios. So, showing some movements and comparing model with self in videos might be the most important factors for effective video clips for language learning.

Citation

Kobayashi, T., Kato, H. & Akahori, K. (2008). Effective Video Clips for Web-based Language Learning. In C. Bonk, M. Lee & T. Reynolds (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2008--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 126-131). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 16, 2019 from .

Keywords

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