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An Ambivalent Technology Consumer’s Experience Adopting and Implementing Technology for Teaching in the Classroom
PROCEEDINGS

, New York University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vienna, Austria ISBN 978-1-880094-65-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

In this single case study, a fifth grade public school teacher addressed how her beliefs about teaching and technology affected her decisions to adopt and implement technology use in her classroom. Although she was a non-user of technology resources skeptical about her abilities, her students used technology effectively in her classroom. Within the framework of the Innovation-Decision Process of Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation model (2003), which emphasized the importance of client beliefs in adopting an innovation, this study examined her path toward deciding to adopt and implement technology. One assertion emerging from this study was that technology adoption and implementation does not necessarily depend on a high level of technology self-efficacy. Another assertion was that the decision to adopt and implement technology in the classroom was an on-going process instead of a discrete, one-time event. Together these assertions indicate the decision and implementation process is dynamic along less considered dimensions.

Citation

Schreier, J. (2008). An Ambivalent Technology Consumer’s Experience Adopting and Implementing Technology for Teaching in the Classroom. In J. Luca & E. Weippl (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2008--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3042-3047). Vienna, Austria: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2019 from .

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