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Self-Regulated Teachers: Catalysts for Technology Integration
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, , Concordia University, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Quebec City, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-63-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This position paper discusses the potential for self-regulatory technology skills to bridge the gap between technology integration expectations and current adoption trends. Drawing on diffusion and adoption theory literature, research on self-regulation, state of the field reports in Canada and the United States, as well as their respective technology curriculum standards, the authors propose a change in preservice technology integration course methodology. The proposed change, shifting the focus away from basic software instruction and toward the development of a self-supporting orientation toward developing technology skills, would be supported by a self-regulation framework of instruction within technology training courses at the preservice level. Future directions for research are explored.

Citation

Aslan, O. & Morris, K. (2007). Self-Regulated Teachers: Catalysts for Technology Integration. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2007--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1964-1972). Quebec City, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

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