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Anchored Feedback: A Classroom Feedback System Considered From An Instructor's Viewpoint
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, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan ; , National Institute of Multimedia Education, Japan ; , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Interaction in classrooms is critical for students' engagement and performance. In this study, we developed a system that allows students to send feedback to the instructor simultaneously through their internet-connected computers. The system was designed particularly from an instructor's viewpoint so that instructors can easily use it, and their cognitive load can be controlled. The feature of the system is the anchored feedback, which is the arrow-shaped metaphor that can contain text and display voted numbers on it. With the function, students can send feedback to the instructor by pointing to the referred place. The content of text is initially hidden and becomes visible when user's cursor is placed on the icon. The function is helpful particularly for instructors to control the amount of concurrent representation at one time and save the limited space on screen as well. We conducted two preliminary experiments, and the results and issues were discussed.

Citation

Oura, H., Kato, H. & Akahori, K. (2006). Anchored Feedback: A Classroom Feedback System Considered From An Instructor's Viewpoint. In T. Reeves & S. Yamashita (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2006--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2965-2972). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 21, 2019 from .

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