You are here:

Everyone Has a Story to Tell: Examining Digital Storytelling in the Classroom
PROCEEDINGS

, Aurora West Community School District, United States ; , Iowa State University, United States ; , Maquoketa Community School District, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-58-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Digital storytelling is a valuable tool that engages students in the learning process, develops decision-making skills, fosters real-world connections and encourages students to work collaboratively. This research project examined the process of using digital storytelling with middle school students. Seventh grade students applied researching, reading and writing skills while creating digital stories during a literacy unit. Overall, findings indicated that projects like digital storytelling can successfully measure students' acquisition of targeted literacy skills as defined by school district standards and benchmarks. Recommendations include providing students with extended blocks of time for project work, teaching technology skills within a meaningful context, supporting teachers when using technology, and empowering students during the learning process. Digital storytelling appears to motivate young learners to tell compelling stories to others.

Citation

Behmer, S., Schmidt, D. & Schmidt, J. (2006). Everyone Has a Story to Tell: Examining Digital Storytelling in the Classroom. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2006--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 655-662). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 20, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Armstrong, S. (2003). The power of storytelling in education. In Armstrong, S. (Ed.), Snapshots! Educational insights from the Thornburg Center (pp. 11-20). The Thornburg Center:
  2. Digital Storytelling Association. (2002). Retrieved November 04, 2004, from http://www.dsaweb.org/01associate/ds.html
  3. Kajder, S., & Swenson, J. (2004). Digital images in the language arts classroom. Learning and Leading with Technology, 31(8), 18-21.
  4. Levin, H. (2003). Making history come alive. Learning and Leading with Technology, 31(3), 22-27.
  5. McDrury, J., & Alterio, M. (2003). Learning through storytelling in higher education. Sterling, VA: Kogan Page Limited.
  6. Mello, R. (2001). The power of storytelling: How oral narrative influences children’s relationships in classrooms. International Journal of Education and the Arts. 2(1).
  7. Simkins, M., Cole, K., Tavalin, F., & Means, B. (2002). Increasing Student Learning Through Multimedia Projects. Alexandria: ASCD.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Digital Stories as Reflection Artifacts:Assessing the Impact of International Immersion on Teachers’ Level of Intercultural Competence

    Martha Green, Lynne Walters & Liangyan Wang, Texas A&M University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 1126–1131

  2. Impacting Academic Achievement with Student Learners Teaching Digital Storytelling to Others: The ATTTCSE Digital Video Project

    Candace Figg, Brock University, Canada; Robin McCartney, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, United States; Walter Gonsoulin, Starkville School District, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 10, No. 1 (March 2010) pp. 38–79

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.