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ExplaNet: A Collaborative Learning Tool and Hybrid Recommender System for Student-Authored Explanations Article

, Boston College, United States ; , University of Washington, United States ; , University of California at Santa Cruz, United States

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 19, Number 1, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

ExplaNet is a web-based, anonymous, asynchronous explanation-sharing network. Instructors post questions to the network and students submit explanatory answers. Students then view and rank the explanations submitted by their peers before optionally resubmitting a final and revised answer. Three classroom evaluations of ExplaNet showed that by using ExplaNet students improved comprehension and retention of difficult concepts. Students who viewed peer-authored explanations between submitting explanations showed greater improvement in submission scores and scores on individual final exam questions than students who did not. In addition, ExplaNet recommends a small subset of explanations to each individual student based on student characteristics and preferences. The recommendation algorithm successfully predicted preferences for student explanations in two classroom trials.

Citation

Masters, J., Madhyastha, T. & Shakouri, A. (2008). ExplaNet: A Collaborative Learning Tool and Hybrid Recommender System for Student-Authored Explanations. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 19(1), 51-74. Waynesville, NC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

Keywords

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