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The effectiveness of traditional tools and computer-aided technologies for health and safety training in the construction sector: A systematic review
ARTICLE

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Computers & Education Volume 138, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

For workers, the exposure to on-site hazards can result in fatalities and serious injuries. To improve safety outcomes, different approaches have been implemented for health and safety training in the construction sector, such as traditional tools and computer-aided technologies (e.g., serious games, computer-generated simulations, virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality). However, the effectiveness of these approaches has been barely explored. In order to bridge this gap, a systematic review of existing studies was conducted. Unlike previous review studies in this field that focused on uncovering the technology characters and challenges, this study mainly evaluated the effectiveness of training using traditional tools and computer-aided technologies on the well-being of individuals. Measures of the effectiveness included knowledge acquisition, unsafe behaviour alteration, and injury rate reduction. Results indicated that: 1. the effectiveness of traditional tools is sufficiently supported by statistical evidence; and 2. the use of computer-aided technologies has evidence to support its effectiveness, but more solid evidence is required to support this statement. The systematic review also revealed that the overall performance of computer-aided technologies is superior in several technical aspects compared to traditional tools, namely, representing the actual workplace situations, providing text-free interfaces, and having better user engagement.

Citation

Gao, Y., Gonzalez, V.A. & Yiu, T.W. (2019). The effectiveness of traditional tools and computer-aided technologies for health and safety training in the construction sector: A systematic review. Computers & Education, 138(1), 101-115. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved May 28, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on June 3, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2019.05.003

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