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National survey of chief pediatric residents' attitudes, practices, and training in collaborating with schools
ARTICLE

, University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, United States ; , Rutgers University, United States ; , Michigan State University, United States ; , , , , , Rutgers University, United States

Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice Volume 15, Number 1, ISSN 2405-4526 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians be trained to collaborate with school personnel and has stated that inadequate collaboration across systems is a contributor to suboptimal health care. Mail-based surveys were used to target chief residents of all pediatric residency programs in the United States (N = 214). Participants completed a 25-item survey inquiring about training, attitudes, and practices in collaborating with schools. A 68.6% response rate was obtained. The majority of respondents (73.5%) view collaboration with school personnel as important or very important and believe it improves overall patient care. However, 30.7% of respondents reported to never have collaborated with school personnel, and 47.8% reported doing so only once or twice a year. Further, 41.3% of respondents felt that school collaboration is not feasible for most pediatricians due to barriers including limited time, scheduling issues, and knowing how to contact relevant school personnel. Most respondents reported that school collaboration was rarely addressed in residency training.

Citation

Shahidullah, J.D., Forman, S.G., Palejwala, M.H., Chaudhuri, A., Pincus, L.E., Lee, E., Shafrir, R. & Barone, C. (2019). National survey of chief pediatric residents' attitudes, practices, and training in collaborating with schools. Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice, 15(1), 82-87. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice on March 15, 2019. Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xjep.2019.02.008

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