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Asymmetries in progression in higher education in Taiwan: Parental education and income effects
ARTICLE

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Economics of Education Review Volume 25, Number 6 ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

A unique data set on Taiwan was employed to investigate the socioeconomic family backgrounds of students attending universities. Our empirical study found that individuals attending university are more likely to come from better-educated families than are those who do not attend university. Students attending public universities, which receive higher government subsidies, tend to come from wealthier families. Furthermore, our results show that the relationship between the size of the government subsidies and family background is not purely progressive. Students attending normal universities/teacher training colleges received the highest subsidies but tended to come from the least-educated families. Students attending the top five public universities come from the most affluent families of Taiwanese society.

Citation

Liu, J.T., Chou, S.Y. & Liu, J.L. Asymmetries in progression in higher education in Taiwan: Parental education and income effects. Economics of Education Review, 25(6), 647-658. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2005.07.002

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