You are here:

Do modern forms of human capital matter in primitive economies? Comparative evidence from Bolivia
ARTICLE

, , ,

Economics of Education Review Volume 24, Number 1, ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

We examine the correlation between modern human capital and income among adult men in four foraging-horticultural societies of Bolivia. Despite their remote location, we find results similar to those found in developed nations. We find that: (a) education correlates with 4.5% higher overall income and with 5.9% higher wages and math skills correlates with 13.5% higher cash income, and (b) the positive correlation between education or math skills and income is higher among households closer to market towns. The high returns to modern human capital even in highly autarkic economies might explain why people in those societies reduce investments in the accumulation of traditional folk knowledge.

Citation

Godoy, R., Karlan, D.S., Rabindran, S. & Huanca, T. (2005). Do modern forms of human capital matter in primitive economies? Comparative evidence from Bolivia. Economics of Education Review, 24(1), 45-53. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 27, 2023 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2003.11.008

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References