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Carving up the Commons: How Software Patents Are Impacting Our Digital Composition Environments
ARTICLE

Computers and Composition Volume 27, Number 3 ISSN 8755-4615 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Since the 1980s, there has been a general trend in U.S. courts to allow certain aspects of software programs to be patented. Digital composition scholars and teachers are indirectly affected by these decisions through the software environments in which we compose but we are also directly affected through our increasingly code-based methods of composition. Just as we can no longer limit our study of writing to text, we can no longer limit our considerations of intellectual property law to the copyright that governs text. Here I examine arguments forwarded by legal scholars and programmers against software patents; these analyses offer not only a convincing critique of the patent system, but also imply that our legal system should treat code more like writing than engineering. An exploration of the software patent debate, then, opens code up for further study in the field of computers and composition.

Citation

Vee, A. Carving up the Commons: How Software Patents Are Impacting Our Digital Composition Environments. Computers and Composition, 27(3), 179-192. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers and Composition on January 29, 2019. Computers and Composition is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2010.06.006

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