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Contending with Terms: “Multimodal” and “Multimedia” in the Academic and Public Spheres
ARTICLE

Computers and Composition Volume 26, Number 4 ISSN 8755-4615 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Scholars have begun naming and defining terms that describe the multifaceted kinds of composing practices occurring in their classrooms and scholarship. This paper analyzes the terms “multimedia” and “multimodal,” examining how each term has been defined and presenting examples of documents, surveys, web sites and others to show when and how each term is used in both academic and non-academic/industry contexts. This paper shows that rather than the use of these terms being driven by any difference in their definitions, their use is more contingent upon the context and the audience to whom a particular discussion is being directed. While “multimedia” is used more frequently in public/industry contexts, “multimodal” is preferred in the field of composition and rhetoric. This preference for terms can be best explained by understanding the differences in how texts are valued and evaluated in these contexts. “Multimodal” is a term valued by instructors because of its emphasis on design and process, whereas “multimedia” is valued in the public sphere because of its emphasis on the production of a deliverable text. Ultimately, instructors need to continue using both terms in their teaching and scholarship because although “multimodal” is a term that is more theoretically accurate to describe the cognitive and socially situated choices students are making in their compositions, “multimedia” works as a gateway term for instructors and scholars to interface with those outside of academia in familiar and important ways.

Citation

Lauer, C. Contending with Terms: “Multimodal” and “Multimedia” in the Academic and Public Spheres. Computers and Composition, 26(4), 225-239. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved October 24, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers and Composition on January 29, 2019. Computers and Composition is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2009.09.001

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