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Teachers’ conceptions of assessment in Chinese contexts: A tripartite model of accountability, improvement, and irrelevance
ARTICLE

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International Journal of Educational Research Volume 50, Number 5 ISSN 0883-0355 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The beliefs teachers have about assessment influence classroom practices and reflect cultural and societal differences. This paper reports the development of a new self-report inventory to examine beliefs teachers in Hong Kong and southern China contexts have about the nature and purpose of assessment. A statistically equivalent model for Hong Kong and southern China teachers had three factors (i.e., improvement, accountability, and irrelevance). The Chinese teachers very strongly associated accountability with improvement (r=.80). This is consistent with the Chinese tradition and policy of using examinations to drive teaching quality and student learning and as a force for merit based decisions. Small differences between the two groups of teachers are consistent with assessment policy differences in the two jurisdictions.

Citation

Brown, G.T.L., Hui, S.K.F., Yu, F.W.M. & Kennedy, K.J. Teachers’ conceptions of assessment in Chinese contexts: A tripartite model of accountability, improvement, and irrelevance. International Journal of Educational Research, 50(5), 307-320. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from International Journal of Educational Research on January 31, 2019. International Journal of Educational Research is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijer.2011.10.003

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