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Developing a problem-solving learning system to assess the effects of different materials on learning performance and attitudes
ARTICLE

, , , Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering ; , Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering

Computers & Education Volume 77, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Cultivating problem-solving abilities has recently become a popular trend in learning systems. It is important to consider that instructional materials can be designed with various types of learning materials, and that the degree to which learning performance is enhanced depends on the type of learning materials provided to the learner. Therefore, this study develops a problem-solving learning system (PSLS) based on animated game-based materials and problem-solving theory; the study also conducts an in-depth analysis of the relationship between learning materials and personal traits. PSLS consists of a series of solution-inferring tasks that can be utilized to train learners in problem solving. The participants in this study consisted of 134 university students who were asked to analyze the differences in learning performance and learners' self-perception of difficulty when using various learning materials. Moreover, eight teachers were included in this study in order to examine the effectiveness of PSLS. Results show that both gender and learning styles influence not only learning performance but also self-perception of difficulty levels with animated game-based materials in certain scenarios. In addition, the participants showed a 95% probability of obtaining above-average user satisfaction, which suggests that PSLS can be a good vehicle for providing problem-solving activities.

Citation

Lin, C.F., Hung, Y.H., Chang, R.I. & Hung, S.H. (2014). Developing a problem-solving learning system to assess the effects of different materials on learning performance and attitudes. Computers & Education, 77(1), 50-66. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved August 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.04.007

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