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Effects of type of multimedia strategy on learning of Chinese characters for non-native novices
ARTICLE

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Computers & Education Volume 70, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of multimedia strategies for instructional techniques and practice on non-native novices' Chinese character learning performance and cognitive load. Two types of multimedia instructional presentations – radical-highlighted and stroke-pronunciation – and two types of practice – visual cue and voice cue – were implemented. Participants were 81 non-native novices randomly assigned to one of the four experimental groups, namely radical-highlighted visual-cue, radical-highlighted voice-cue, stroke-pronunciation visual-cue and stroke-pronunciation voice-cue. An Internet-based e-learning course on the basis of Chinese characters was implemented and delivered as experimental instruction using a Moodle platform. The results show that, for non-native novices, the stroke-pronunciation (SP) strategy of showing strokes with pronunciations is better than the radical-highlighted (RH) strategy, enabling the novices to achieve better performance in identifying Chinese radicals. The significant two-way interactions suggest that (1) the SP presentation should be delivered with the voice-cue (VoC) practice to elicit better performance in writing and in identifying characters and strokes, and (2) the RH presentation should be delivered with visual-cue (ViC) practice to elicit better performance in character writing. Furthermore, participants showed similar levels of perceived cognitive load toward the stroke-based task and the radical-based task. However, when the SP presentation was delivered with the VoC practice, participants revealed lower perceived cognitive load toward the writing task.

Citation

Chen, M.P., Wang, L.C., Chen, H.J. & Chen, Y.C. (2014). Effects of type of multimedia strategy on learning of Chinese characters for non-native novices. Computers & Education, 70(1), 41-52. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 11, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.07.042

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