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The worked-example effect using ill-defined problems: Learning to recognise designers' styles
ARTICLE

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Learning and Instruction Volume 19, Number 2, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This research uses cognitive load theory and theories of visual literacy to provide a theoretical underpinning for techniques to improve students' ability to recognise designers' styles in higher education. Using a lecture followed by tutorial format, students were required to learn the characteristics needed to identify a designer's work either by studying worked examples or by completing problem-solving tasks. The principle conclusion drawn from two experiments was that novice learners who have a moderate level of visual literacy skills are more successful at identifying a designer's work after studying worked examples compared to novice learners provided with problem-solving tasks.

Citation

Rourke, A. & Sweller, J. (2009). The worked-example effect using ill-defined problems: Learning to recognise designers' styles. Learning and Instruction, 19(2), 185-199. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 24, 2021 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2008.03.006

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