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The cross-lagged relations between children’s academic skill development, task-avoidance, and parental beliefs about success
ARTICLE

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Learning and Instruction Volume 21, Number 5, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This longitudinal study investigated the cross-lagged associations between children’s academic skill development, task-avoidant behaviour in the context of homework, and parental beliefs about their child’s success from kindergarten to Grade 2. The participants were 1267 children. The children’s pre-skills were assessed at the end of the kindergarten year, and math and reading skills at the end of Grade 1 and Grade 2. Parents provided ratings of their beliefs about their children’s school success and task-avoidant behaviour with regard to homework at the end of Grades 1 and 2. The results showed that children’s math and reading skills predicted children’s task-avoidant behaviour regarding homework as rated by mothers, but not by fathers, when autoregressive effects were taken into account. In addition, task-avoidant behaviour predicted the mothers’ subsequent beliefs about their children’s school success but not vice versa. A reciprocal effect was found between fathers’ beliefs about success and children’s task-avoidance.

Citation

Mägi, K., Lerkkanen, M.K., Poikkeus, A.M., Rasku-Puttonen, H. & Nurmi, J.E. (2011). The cross-lagged relations between children’s academic skill development, task-avoidance, and parental beliefs about success. Learning and Instruction, 21(5), 664-675. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2011.03.001

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