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Learning to prove in geometry: Learning from heuristic examples and how it can be supported
ARTICLE

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Learning and Instruction Volume 18, Number 1, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This field experiment tested whether a special type of worked-out examples (i.e., heuristic examples) helps learners develop better conceptual knowledge about mathematical proving and proving skills than a control condition focussing on mathematical contents. Additionally, we analysed the benefits of self-explanation prompts and completion requirements in a 2×2-design. The participants' (N=111 student teachers) proving skills and their conceptual knowledge were significantly better when learning with heuristic examples as compared to the control condition. Completion requirements impaired learning especially in combination with self-explanation prompts. The sole provision of self-explanation prompts, in contrast, fostered conceptual knowledge as well as skills.

Citation

Hilbert, T.S., Renkl, A., Kessler, S. & Reiss, K. (2008). Learning to prove in geometry: Learning from heuristic examples and how it can be supported. Learning and Instruction, 18(1), 54-65. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on February 1, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2006.10.008

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