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A Model for Determining Teaching Efficacy through the Use of Qualitative Single Subject Design, Student Learning Outcomes and Associative Statistics
ARTICLE

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Journal on School Educational Technology Volume 10, Number 1, ISSN 0973-2217

Abstract

Many universities and colleges are increasingly concerned about enhancing the comprehension and knowledge of their students, particularly in the classroom. One of the method to enhancing student success is teaching effectiveness. The objective of this research paper is to propose a novel research model which examines the relationship between teaching effectiveness and student learning outcomes qualitatively. This new model will use a unique and in-depth qualitative case study methodology especially designed for the instructional setting. The anticipated qualitative data collecting techniques will include, but not limited to the following: observations, personal interviews, qualitative survey questionnaires, research field notes, document review, etc. The proposed Model used assumed data and applied statistical Cross-Tabulation and Chi-Square Tests, including a theoretical analysis of the open-ended responses and field notes recorded from participants (a sample of 32 students presently enrolled in a Semester-long English ENG 1200-01 course at a public university in North Carolina). The associative statistical findings found a positive relationship between the teaching effectiveness and student learning. The outcomes of the study will increase the current lack of information on the use of qualitative research designs by determining teaching efficacy and its effects on student achievement. This new model expands the existing measures by providing new measures to examine the teaching effectiveness and its effect on student learning.

Citation

Osler, J.E. & Mansaray, M. (2014). A Model for Determining Teaching Efficacy through the Use of Qualitative Single Subject Design, Student Learning Outcomes and Associative Statistics. Journal on School Educational Technology, 10(1), 22-35. Retrieved December 14, 2019 from .

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