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Helping students learn with classroom response systems
PROCEEDINGS

, , University of Victoria, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Electronic selected response systems have been available for more than a decade. These systems allow a teacher to present multiple-choice questions, accept responses wirelessly and then display a graphic of the response distribution to support discussion. Newer systems allow for short constructed text or numeric responses, graphs produced on graphing calculators, or even free-form constructed responses (i.e. annotated images). As the costs associated with these pedagogically sound, rugged, relatively low-threshold technologies diminish, they are likely to become more common in the classroom. As technology-literate teacher educators we should examine and assess these technologies, model their use in our classrooms, and share our findings with respect to their utility with our students and colleagues. This paper reviews the nature and application of the various types of response systems and highlights some of the issues and benefits associated with using such in classrooms generally, and teacher education programs in specific.

Citation

Pelton, T. & Francis Pelton, L. (2005). Helping students learn with classroom response systems. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1554-1559). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 21, 2019 from .

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