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Facilitating Effective Digital Game-Based Learning Behaviors and Learning Performances of Students Based on a Collaborative Knowledge Construction Strategy
ARTICLE

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Interactive Learning Environments Volume 26, Number 1, ISSN 1049-4820

Abstract

Researchers have recognized the potential of educational computer games in improving students' learning engagement and outcomes; however, facilitating effective learning behaviors during the gaming process remains an important and challenging issue. In this paper, a collaborative knowledge construction strategy was incorporated into an educational computer game to facilitate students' knowledge sharing and organizing during the game-based learning process. An experiment was conducted to examine the students' learning behavioral patterns, group efficacy, and problem-solving awareness. The experimental results revealed that the proposed approach improved the students' learning achievements and awareness of problem-solving. Moreover, from the analysis of the students' behavior sequences, it was found that, with the collaborative knowledge construction mechanism, the students revealed significantly more aggressive learning behavioral patterns, such as "comparing and observing the learning targets" and "seeking clues and answers" during the gaming process. This implies that integrating the collaborative knowledge construction mechanism into the gaming process has great potential for helping students effectively learn and organize knowledge as well as fostering their awareness of applying the acquired knowledge to dealing with problems.

Citation

Sung, H.Y. & Hwang, G.J. (2018). Facilitating Effective Digital Game-Based Learning Behaviors and Learning Performances of Students Based on a Collaborative Knowledge Construction Strategy. Interactive Learning Environments, 26(1), 118-134. Retrieved July 17, 2019 from .

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