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A Votable Concept Mapping Approach to Promoting Students' Attentional Behavior: An Analysis of Sequential Behavioral Patterns and Brainwave Data
ARTICLE

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Journal of Educational Technology & Society Volume 21, Number 2, ISSN 1176-3647 e-ISSN 1176-3647

Abstract

This study explores the effects of integrated concept maps and classroom polling systems on students' learning performance, attentional behavior, and brainwaves associated with attention. Twenty-nine students from an Educational Research Methodology course were recruited as participants. For data collection, inclass quizzes, attentional behavior analysis, and a 20-minute structured interview were applied, and the attention-associated brainwaves of the participants were measured. In the first week, a group-polling method was introduced in class; in the second week, participants were asked to draw concept maps using pen and paper (PnP concept mapping); and in the third week, the polling system and concept maps were integrated (votable concept mapping) and applied. The results showed that the PnP concept mapping approach improved the quiz results of students with lower learning motivation prior to the course, while the votable concept mapping method was effective in stimulating students' attention during class. It was therefore suggested that instructors adopt methods integrating concept maps and polling tools to stimulate students' attention and thereby promote a positive cycle of attentional behavior in the classroom. For example, students' attentional behavior during an activity facilitated their attentional behavior after the activity, and this behavior continued until the next activity.

Citation

Sun, J.C.Y., Hwang, G.J., Lin, Y.Y., Yu, S.J., Pan, L.C. & Chen, A.Y.Z. (2018). A Votable Concept Mapping Approach to Promoting Students' Attentional Behavior: An Analysis of Sequential Behavioral Patterns and Brainwave Data. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 21(2), 177-191. Retrieved September 21, 2019 from .

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