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Investigating the Effectiveness of a Learning Activity Supported by a Mobile Multimedia Learning System to Enhance Autonomous EFL Learning in Authentic Contexts
ARTICLE

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Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 66, Number 4, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

A learning activity supported by a mobile multimedia learning system (MMLS) was designed in this study. We aimed to test the effectiveness of the learning activity to enhance autonomous language learning in quasi-experimental Study 1 using a pretest/posttest design. Two groups participated in the learning activity: the students in a control group (n = 27) completed the activity using traditional approach whereas the students in an experimental group (n = 26) completed the activity using MMLS. The results of Study 1 showed that the experimental students outperformed their counterparts on the post-test (F = 29.602, p < 0.005, partial eta-squared = 0.372). In a non-experimental Study 2, the experimental students (n = 26) were assigned two learning tasks, the first task was completed individually and the second task in collaboration. We aimed to investigate which learning approach to complete tasks (i.e. individual vs. collaborative) enhances learning performance better by comparing students' scores on two tasks. In addition, we explored students' perceptions towards MMLS. The results of Study 2 showed that the students had better learning performance when they completed tasks in collaboration than individually. The results also showed that the students had high perceptions towards MMLS. Based on our results, we make suggestions and provide directions for future research.

Citation

Shadiev, R., Hwang, W.Y. & Liu, T.Y. (2018). Investigating the Effectiveness of a Learning Activity Supported by a Mobile Multimedia Learning System to Enhance Autonomous EFL Learning in Authentic Contexts. Educational Technology Research and Development, 66(4), 893-912. Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

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