You are here:

Effectiveness of Two Educational Video Games
PROCEEDING

, Valdosta State University, United States ; , Pearl River Community College, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper is an overview of a quasi-experimental study performed at a college that compares differences between two different video games. The video games were based on Malone's theory of game design that involved challenge, fantasy, and curiosity. Variables being examined were student engagement, content knowledge gain, and demographical implications when using the two games to learn French phrases. No significant results were found in content knowledge gain and engagement between the participants. A slight difference in relation to minority status had been discovered as well as participants’ overall satisfaction with the games.

Citation

Hartsell, T. & Dedeaux, T. (2018). Effectiveness of Two Educational Video Games. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 685-689). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 16, 2019 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Almeida, L.C. (2012). The effect of an educational computer game for the achievement of factual and simple conceptual knowledge acquisition. Education Research International, 2012, 1-5.
  2. Barr, M. (2017). Video games can develop graduate skills in higher education students: A randomised trial. Computers & Education, 113, 86-97.
  3. Brockmyer, J.H., Fox, C.M., Curtiss, K.A., McBroom, E., Burkhart, K.M., & Pidrunzy, J.N. (2009). The devel-opment of the Game Engagement Questionnaire: A measure of engagement in video-game playing. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 624-634.
  4. Chang, M., Evans, M.A., Kim, S., Norton, A., Deater-Deckard, K., & Samur, Y. (2016). The effects of an educational video game on mathematical engagement. Education and Information Technologies, 21 (5), 1283–1297. Https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-015-9382-8
  5. Entertainment Software Association. (2015). Essential facts about the computer and video game industry. Retrieved from http://www.theesa.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/ESA-Essential-Facts-2015.pdf
  6. Entertainment Software Association. (2017). Essential facts about the computer and video game industry. Retrieved from http://www.theesa.com/article/two-thirds-american-households-regularly-play-video-games/
  7. DeHaan, J. (2005). Acquisition of Japanese as a foreign language through a baseball video game. Foreign Language Annals, 38(2), 278-282.
  8. Hwang, G.J., Chiu, L.Y., & Chen, C.H. (2015). A contextual game-based learning approach to improving students' inquiry-based learning performance in social studies courses. Computers & Education, 81, 13-25.
  9. Ku, O., Chen, S.Y., Wu, D.H., Lao, A.C.C., & Chan, T.W. (2014). The effects of game-Based learning on mathematical confidence and performance: High ability vs. Low ability. Educational Technology & Society, 17(3), 65–78.
  10. Lenhart, A. (2015). Teens, Technology and Friendships. Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/08/06/teens-technology-and Friendships/
  11. Malone, T.N. (1984). Heuristics for designing enjoyable user interfaces: Lessons from computer games. In J.C. Thomas, & M.L. Schneider (Eds.), Human Factors in Computer Systems (pp. 1-12). Norwood, NJ:

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

Presentation

Slides w/Audio View

Slides

Also Read

Related Collections