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Engaging, Accessible, and Memorable: Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Applications in Online and Blended Higher Education Courses
PROCEEDING

, University of Houston, United States ; , University of Rhode Island, United States ; , University of Louisville, United States ; , EDA Solutions; New York Institute of Technology, United States ; , , Eastern New Mexico University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Washington, D.C., United States ISBN 978-1-939797-32-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This interactive panel presentation and discussion offers insights and conversation around applications of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework to online and blended higher education courses Panelists will explore how the UDL principles of multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression can address learner variability and improve access and connection in online learning Strategies and exemplars from research and practice will be shared, and the audience will take part in contributing questions and generating solutions from the UDL perspective.

Citation

Gronseth, S., Dalton, E., Bauder, D., McPherson, S., Singh, A. & Viner, M. (2018). Engaging, Accessible, and Memorable: Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Applications in Online and Blended Higher Education Courses. In E. Langran & J. Borup (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2169-2174). Washington, D.C., United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 18, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Learning Together: Strategies for Supporting Collaborative Learning in Online Courses from a Universal Design for Learning Perspective

    Susie Gronseth, University of Houston, United States; Debra K Bauder, University of Louisville, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2018 (Jun 25, 2018) pp. 1068–1081

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.