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Racism in Cyberspace: Can We Ignore It?
PROCEEDINGS

, Northern Arizona University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-47-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Distance learning, especially in computer-mediated environments, is the dominant trend in education. Universities fear that they will be left behind or even become extinct if they do not offer online courses (Roblyer, 1999). However, very little is known about effective pedagogy in online environments, much less the power, authority, and control relationships that occur when conversations are not face-to-face. The course described in this article is a Bilingual Education course where participants were involved in extensive writing and publishing of their ideas on the web. Through bulletin board postings, the power relationships between majority and minority students became evident during the semester. Students described their struggles with living and working in a society that, in many cases, institutionalizes racism.

Citation

Montes, L.S.d. (2003). Racism in Cyberspace: Can We Ignore It?. In C. Crawford, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2003--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 636-639). Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

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