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The Association between Technology and Student Achievement in US History
PROCEEDING

, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

While technology is touted as a platform for transformative learning, much has yet to be learned about how technology impacts content knowledge acquisition. The central question of this discussion is to explore what large-scale achievement data tell us about the association between technology and student learning. Using NAEP data for U.S. History 12th grade assessment, relational differences were found between text-dependent and multimodal instruction.

Citation

Heafner, T. (2017). The Association between Technology and Student Achievement in US History. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1607-1613). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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