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How Present Are You? Best Practices in Improving Social, Teaching, and Cognitive Presence in Online Graduate Education
PROCEEDING

, Johns Hopkins University & DoD, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

What best practices exist to engage learners for interactions across the social, cognitive and teaching presences in an online environment that work together to best serve the learners? This interactive session offers practical methods discovered through the application of empirical research as to what is most effective before, during and after the online course to increase interaction and model innovative collaboration in a shared online environment.

Citation

Robey, R. (2017). How Present Are You? Best Practices in Improving Social, Teaching, and Cognitive Presence in Online Graduate Education. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1770-1773). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Learning Together: Strategies for Supporting Collaborative Learning in Online Courses from a Universal Design for Learning Perspective

    Susie Gronseth, University of Houston, United States; Debra K Bauder, University of Louisville, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2018 (Jun 25, 2018) pp. 1068–1081

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.