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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in Higher Education: Possibilities, Pitfalls & Practices
PROCEEDING

, University of Rhode Island and Dalton Education Services International, United States ; , University of Houston, United States ; , Roosevelt University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The framework of Universal Design for Learning offers guidance and opportunity for post-secondary institutions to diversify instructional practices and environments to address the varied needs of today’s learners. Legislation supports the importance of equity of access and opportunity in higher education. UDL and its three core principles, multiple means of engagement, multiple means of representation, and multiple means of action & expression, provide a usable and research-based framework for the design and implementation of face-2-face and online instruction that integrates variation and flexibility of format. Exemplary practices in implementation of the core principles and challenges faced by the field are included.

Citation

Dalton, E., Gronseth, S. & Anderson, C. (2017). Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in Higher Education: Possibilities, Pitfalls & Practices. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1501-1506). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 25, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Learning Together: Strategies for Supporting Collaborative Learning in Online Courses from a Universal Design for Learning Perspective

    Susie Gronseth, University of Houston, United States; Debra K Bauder, University of Louisville, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2018 (Jun 25, 2018) pp. 1068–1081

  2. Engaging, Accessible, and Memorable: Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Applications in Online and Blended Higher Education Courses

    Susie Gronseth, University of Houston, United States; Elizabeth Dalton, University of Rhode Island, United States; Debra Bauder, University of Louisville, United States; Sarah McPherson, EDA Solutions; New York Institute of Technology, United States; Ajay Singh & Mark Viner, Eastern New Mexico University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2169–2174

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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