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Electronic versus Print Textbooks: The Influence of Textbook Format on University Students' Self-Regulated Learning Strategies, Motivation, and Text Anxiety
ARTICLE

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American Journal of Distance Education Volume 27, Number 3, ISSN 0892-3647

Abstract

Because a majority of university students do not regularly read course textbooks, a study was conducted to determine if portable electronic textbooks (e-textbooks) would increase university student motivation to read by enhancing cognitive learning strategies and self-regulation of learning. The participants included 538 university students who self-chose to use either a print or e-textbook throughout the semester. The dependent variables self-efficacy, intrinsic value, cognitive strategies, self-regulation, and text anxiety were measured in each of two groups of participants using the Technology Confidences and Attitudes scale and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). The results of a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) analysis indicated that there was a significant difference in the students' MSLQ scores based on their choice of textbook format. These results imply that students who use e-textbooks are more likely to use cognitive and self-regulation strategies than students who use traditional print textbooks in their courses.

Citation

Rockinson-Szapkiw, A.J., Wendt, J. & Lunde, R. (2013). Electronic versus Print Textbooks: The Influence of Textbook Format on University Students' Self-Regulated Learning Strategies, Motivation, and Text Anxiety. American Journal of Distance Education, 27(3), 179-188. Retrieved October 18, 2019 from .

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