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Objectivism versus Constructivism: Do We Need a New Philosophical Paradigm?
ARTICLE

Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 39, Number 3, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

Analyzes the philosophical assumptions underlying instructional systems technology (IST). Cognitive and behavioral learning theories are discussed, their effects on IST are considered, the philosophical paradigms of objectivism and constructivism are compared, applications of constructivism are described, and implications of constructivism for IST are suggested. (30 references) (LRW)

Citation

Jonassen, D.H. (1991). Objectivism versus Constructivism: Do We Need a New Philosophical Paradigm?. Educational Technology Research and Development, 39(3), 5-14. Retrieved April 26, 2019 from .

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