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The Effectiveness of a Facebook-Assisted Teaching Method on Knowledge and Attitudes about Cervical Cancer Prevention and HPV Vaccination Intention among Female Adolescent Students in Taiwan
ARTICLE

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Health Education & Behavior Volume 42, Number 3, ISSN 1090-1981

Abstract

Background: Lack of education is a known barrier to vaccination, but data on the design and effectiveness of interventions remain limited. Objective: This study aims to identify the effectiveness of a Facebook-assisted teaching method on female adolescents' knowledge and attitudes about cervical cancer prevention and on their human papillomavirus vaccination intention. Method: A quasi-experimental time series research design was used. Two hundred female adolescents at a senior high school in Taipei were recruited into two groups. Following a classroom lecture, one group was provided a Facebook-assisted online discussion, and the other group was provided an in-person discussion forum. A demographic questionnaire and cervical cancer prevention questionnaire were distributed. Data were analyzed for descriptive statistics and generalized estimation equations. Results: Improvement from T0 to T2 in knowledge and attitude scores was 4.204 and 4.496 points, respectively. The Facebook group's improvement in vaccination intention from T0 to T2 was 2.310 times greater than the control group's improvement under conditions of out-of-pocket expenses and 2.368 times greater under conditions of free vaccination. Conclusions: School-based cervical cancer prevention education can be effective. The Facebook-assisted discussion method was more effective than the in-person discussion. Providing the human papillomavirus vaccine free of charge would increase female adolescents' intention to be vaccinated.

Citation

Lai, C.Y., Wu, W.W., Tsai, S.Y., Cheng, S.F., Lin, K.C. & Liang, S.Y. (2015). The Effectiveness of a Facebook-Assisted Teaching Method on Knowledge and Attitudes about Cervical Cancer Prevention and HPV Vaccination Intention among Female Adolescent Students in Taiwan. Health Education & Behavior, 42(3), 352-360. Retrieved September 17, 2019 from .

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