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Do English Listening Outcome and Cognitive Load Change for Different Media Delivery Modes in U-Learning?
PROCEEDINGS

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International Conference e-Learning 2014. Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems,

Abstract

Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media delivery modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media delivery mode (sound and text vs. sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load. Participants were 162 students majoring in Applied Foreign Language at a university in Taiwan. The students were randomly assigned to either single mode (sound) or double mode (sound and text). The research questions are (a) whether students learning with double mode outperformed students learning with single mode in listening comprehension; and (b) whether students learning with double mode hold less cognitive load than students learning with single mode. If the answers to these questions are affirmative, then the modality effect occurs and the redundancy effect does not occur. The results demonstrated that (a) text significantly enhanced English listening comprehension and lowered cognitive load; (b) students with higher English listening comprehension held lower cognitive load, and vice versa; (c) text was added no benefit to schema construction in long-term memory; and (d) complex media deliveries were not necessarily helpful to learning. Results (a) and (b) confirmed that the modality effect occurred, and the redundancy effect did not occur in the present study. [For full proceedings, see ED557189.]

Citation

Chang, C.C., Lei, H. & Tseng, J.S. (2014). Do English Listening Outcome and Cognitive Load Change for Different Media Delivery Modes in U-Learning?. Presented at International Conference e-Learning 2014. Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2014. Retrieved November 18, 2019 from .

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