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Using Self-Directed Video Prompting to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities
ARTICLE

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Journal of Behavioral Education Volume 22, Number 3, ISSN 1053-0819

Abstract

This study examined the effects of self-directed video prompting presented via an iPod Touch on teaching four adolescents with moderate-to-severe intellectual and developmental disabilities two daily living tasks. Students were taught to wash a table using instructor-delivered video prompts. After reaching 80% correct for at least three consecutive sessions, a system of most-to-least prompts was used to teach them to use the iPod Touch and a video prompting app (inPromptu) independently. In the final phase, students used inPromptu on the iPod Touch to teach themselves to vacuum with self-directed video prompts. Results of the study demonstrate that all four students learned to wash a table with instructor-directed video prompts, they all learned to use inPromptu on the iPod Touch independently, two students used inPromptu on the iPod Touch to teach themselves to vacuum, and a third student was learning to vacuum using inPromptu.

Citation

Cannella-Malone, H.I., Brooks, D.G. & Tullis, C.A. (2013). Using Self-Directed Video Prompting to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Behavioral Education, 22(3), 169-189. Retrieved January 22, 2020 from .

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