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The Future of Professional Development Will Be Designed, Not Discovered: Response to Moon, Passmore, Reiser, and Michaels, "Beyond Comparisons of Online versus Face-to-Face PD"
ARTICLE

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Journal of Teacher Education Volume 65, Number 3, ISSN 0022-4871

Abstract

This article represents a response to the authors' "Journal of Teacher Education" ("JTE") article (Fishman et al., 2013) by Moon, Passmore, Reiser, and Michaels (2013). The authors believe that Moon et al. have properly identified both the value in their study and the importance of moving beyond not only their study, but similar studies, to better serve the urgent need for professional development (PD) designs that are effective in helping teachers successfully enact curricular reforms, such as the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS; Wilson, 2013) and the Common Core State Standards in mathematics and English language arts (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010; Porter, McMaken, Hwang, & Yang, 2011). Fishman, et al. agree wholeheartedly that the field would benefit from scholarship that leads to "research-based design principles to guide the ongoing development, implementation, and evaluation efforts in online PD" (Moon et al., p. 1). In this article, the authors briefly recap their study and address the issues raised by Moon et al. in their commentary. They then expand on the ideas introduced by Moon et al. for how to take advantage of the opportunity for studying teacher learning related to the NGSS presented by the Next Generation Science Exemplar System (NGSX) PD platform.

Citation

Fishman, B., Konstantopoulos, S., Kubitskey, B.W., Vath, R., Park, G., Johnson, H. & Edelson, D. (2014). The Future of Professional Development Will Be Designed, Not Discovered: Response to Moon, Passmore, Reiser, and Michaels, "Beyond Comparisons of Online versus Face-to-Face PD". Journal of Teacher Education, 65(3), 261-264. Retrieved December 2, 2020 from .

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