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Learning from Past and Present: Electronic Response Systems in College Lecture Halls
Article

, Arizona State University, United States ; , University of Alberta, Canada

JCMST Volume 21, Number 2, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This article reviews literature from the past 33 years particular to the use of electronic response systems in college lecture halls. Electronic response systems, primarily used in science courses, have allowed students to provide immediate feedback to multiple-choice questions, and inform the instructor of student understanding. Research from the 1960s and 1970s indicates there is no significant correlation between student academic achievement and a stimulus-response method of using such systems. Recent studies have indicated there is significant student increase of conceptual gains in physics when electronic response systems are used to facilitate feedback in a constructivist-oriented classroom. Students have always favored the use of electronic response systems and attribute such factors as attentiveness and personal understanding to using electronic response systems. Ultimately, this review of literature points to the pedagogical practices of the instructor, not the incorporation of the technology as being key to student comprehension. Electronic response systems are viewed as a tool that holds a promise of facilitating earnest discussion. Recommendations are made that professional development focus on pedagogical practice for instructors considering the use of an electronic response system.

Citation

Judson, E. & Sawada, a.D. (2002). Learning from Past and Present: Electronic Response Systems in College Lecture Halls. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 21(2), 167-181. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 20, 2019 from .

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