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Introducing a learning management system at a Russian university: Students' and teachers' perceptions
ARTICLE

, , National Research University Higher School of Economics, 25/12 Bolshaja Pecherskaja Ulitsa, Nizhny Novgorod 603155, Russian Federation

IRRODL Volume 15, Number 1, ISSN 1492-3831 Publisher: Athabasca University Press

Abstract

Learning management systems (LMS) have been proven to encourage a constructive approach to knowledge acquisition and support active learning. One of the keys to successful and efficient use of LMS is how the stakeholders adopt and perceive this learning tool. The present research is therefore motivated by the importance of understanding teachers' and students' perceptions of LMS in order to anticipate possible issues (problems) and help to build a productive learning environment and a committed user community. The paper looks at this process at a Russian university (National Research University Higher School of Economics – HSE) where the system is being implemented and examines the following issues: qualification and readiness of the stakeholders to use LMS and their perceptions of the system's convenience, effectiveness, and usefulness. The research reveals remarkable divergence of students’ and teachers’ perceptions of various aspects of LMS which must be considered when raising the effectiveness of the system and building commitment to e-learning. They are analyzed and explicated in the present paper.

Citation

Emelyanova, N. & Voronina, E. (2014). Introducing a learning management system at a Russian university: Students' and teachers' perceptions. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 15(1),. Athabasca University Press. Retrieved March 24, 2019 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Learning from Transitioning to New Technology that Supports Online and Blended Learning: A Case Study

    Jennifer Lock & Carol Johnson, University of Calgary, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2016 (Nov 14, 2016) pp. 184–192

  2. Adoption of Innovation: The Road to Implementation of a Learning Management System

    Cynthia Sistek-Chandler & Michael Myers, National University, United States; Susan Silverstone, National University, School of Business, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 480–490

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