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Learning to teach with laptops: A case study of teacher change
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Atlanta, GA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-52-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Even for veteran educators, learning to teach with a new technology can be disorienting. This case study describes how a longtime high school English teacher planned for and began using Internet-connected laptops with her freshman-level literature classes. Activity theory (Engestrom, 1987; Engestrom, 1999) afforded a conceptual base for exploring how the teacher restructured her teaching through engagement in cycles of planning, enactment, and reflection. Consideration is given to contributions of the teacher's own personal practical knowledge (Connelly and Clandinin, 1988), her participation in a school-university partnership (Day, 1998), and the pull exerted by genre-typical aspects (Bazerman, 2003) of computer software and other class materials.

Citation

Buell, J. (2004). Learning to teach with laptops: A case study of teacher change. In R. Ferdig, C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2004--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1984-1985). Atlanta, GA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 17, 2019 from .

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