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A Technology-Based Innovation To Facilitate Teacher Access to and Use of Assessments of JHS Students' Self-Regulatory, Affective and Motivational Beliefs about Mathematics
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Abstract

The development of the Mathematics Assessment Questionnaire (MAQ), a survey of thoughts and feelings, for students in grades 7 through 9 is described. The adaptation of the MAQ to an on-line, computer-based administration is also described. This adaptation included the development of a teacher program disk to facilitate teacher access to student responses. The developmental work that led to the computer version of the MAQ included: (1) a feasibility study in 1986-87 that included reviews by experienced mathematics teachers; (2) small-scale studies (1987-88) of the meaningfulness of the metacognitive statements for students and teachers and the type of problem best suited for these statements; (3) a pilot study (spring, 1988) of 300 paper-and-pencil items administered to 1,500 students in New York City public schools; and (4) a large-scale study (fall 1988) involving the administration of 162 paper-and-pencil items to 1,737 students in New York City public schools. The development process indicated that the use of technology for a classroom-level assessment tool has broadened the assessment process for students and added direct communication through notes to teachers. The use of this technology has increased teacher flexible access to information and has encouraged teachers to examine the information from different perspectives. Five tables and six figures illustrate the development process and student beliefs and responses. (SLD)

Citation

Tittle, C.K. & Hecht, D. A Technology-Based Innovation To Facilitate Teacher Access to and Use of Assessments of JHS Students' Self-Regulatory, Affective and Motivational Beliefs about Mathematics. Retrieved November 12, 2019 from .

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