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Assessed Effectiveness of the Computer-Assisted Study Skills Improvement Program (CASSIP) as Reported by Program Directors
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Abstract

The Computer-Assisted Study Skills Improvement Program (CASSIP) uses interactive instruction with a computer in these areas: managing time, improving memory, taking lecture notes, reading textbooks, taking examinations, writing themes and reports, making oral reports, improving scholastic motivation, improving interpersonal relations, and improving concentration. This study surveyed by questionnaire the reactions of CASSIP directors (n=27) regarding the effectiveness of CASSIP, publicizing procedures, and hardware/software problems. Reported advantages of CASSIP were: (1) counselees could proceed at their own pace, take better notes from the computer, and review as needed; (2) the computer was not judgmental and did not forget material or digress from the subject; and (3) the computer presented material in smaller units, provided counselees with instantaneous feedback, worked unlimited hours, and could store large amounts of information. Disadvantages of CASSIP were also reported. One disadvantage was that the counselees might accept information without questioning its validity and might act on the computer's suggestions without seeking help in their evaluation. Another disadvantage was that the computer lacked human feelings such as empathy, was insensitive to counselee needs, and had limited capacity for individualized responses to counselees; it was also reported that the computer could permit too easy access to confidential files, required programming skills not usually possessed by counselors, and start-up costs could exceed resources. It appears that CASSIP's advantages, however, outweigh its disadvantages. (ABL)

Citation

Brown, W.F. & Forristall-Brown, D.Z. Assessed Effectiveness of the Computer-Assisted Study Skills Improvement Program (CASSIP) as Reported by Program Directors. Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on March 21, 2014. [Original Record]

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