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Leveraging Affordances of the Mashup Tool Pinterest for Writing and Reflecting on Culture
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, North Carolina State University, United States ; , Clemson University, United States ; , , North Carolina State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper presents findings from a study in which American teachers studying abroad pinned photographs from mobile phones onto group Pinterest boards and reflected on their own and others’ cultures. Findings suggest Pinterest is a useful tool for promoting personal reflection on media collected in real-time, with the potential to support collaborative reflection on the same media when follow-up commenting or generalization activities are modeled and structured appropriately. Findings have implications for teachers and technology coaches wishing to support common core standards around writing in English and history/social studies.

Citation

Oliver, K., Cook, M., Pritchard, R. & Lee, S. (2014). Leveraging Affordances of the Mashup Tool Pinterest for Writing and Reflecting on Culture. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1128-1134). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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Cited By

  1. Pinterest + Research = Preservice Teachers’ Strategic Use of Instructional Strategies

    Debbie VanOverbeke & Paulette Stefanick, Southwest Minnesota State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 2406–2412

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.