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Distance education: A measurement of job satisfaction of full-time faculty in AACSB accredited colleges of business
DISSERTATION

, University of Arkansas, United States

University of Arkansas . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the research was intended to determine if a there is a difference in the level of job satisfaction experienced from teaching in a traditional classroom setting versus teaching an asynchronous distance education course. Second, the study was further designed to ascertain if job satisfaction among full-time faculty in AACSB accredited colleges of business, who teach asynchronous distance education courses differs depending on certain characteristics. Those characteristics included: (a) gender, (b) age, (c) ethnicity, (d) tenure status, (e) type of institution, (f) number of years higher education teaching experience, (g) availability of technical support for faculty, and (h) faculty training in using distance education.

The study was conducted to determine the level of job satisfaction of full-time faculty teaching in AACSB accredited colleges of business by collecting data using a modified Job Descriptive Index via the Internet.

A comparison was made between each of the job satisfaction scores from the traditional classroom teaching method and the scores from teaching via distance learning. Both teaching methods were compared to determine if a significant difference exists in any of the categories. Differences between the two teaching methods were analyzed using an independent t-test.

The job satisfaction score for teaching distance education courses by different characteristics were analyzed with an ANOVA. These tests determined if significant differences in job satisfaction in teaching distance courses exist between faculty in different characteristic categories.

The data compiled in this study indicated that there are significant differences between job satisfaction gleaned from teaching distance courses and teaching in a traditional classroom. In addition, the research indicated that there is a difference in the job satisfaction level gained from teaching distance education by distance education instructors based on the personal, professional and institutional demographics. However, when the research controlled for a Type I error, the findings indicated that no, there are no significant differences in job satisfaction for teaching distance courses based on demographics.

Citation

Neyman, S.E. Distance education: A measurement of job satisfaction of full-time faculty in AACSB accredited colleges of business. Ph.D. thesis, University of Arkansas. Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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